How to Survive the Rest of Senior Year

By Danielle Matta

Senioritis: the all-consuming state of mind afflicting 12th graders across the globe, resulting in a severe lack of motivation, extreme apathy, and spouts of frustrated, and sometimes aggressive, behavior. Symptoms include: putting off assignments until five minutes before they’re due, napping at inappropriate times, muttering to yourself while darkly glaring at a classroom, expressing hostility towards authority, friends and small children, and frequently daydreaming of June 18th.

Recognize any of these warning signs in yourself? Well, I’m here to tell you, class of 2015, that I too, have senioritis. The rumors are true, and it does actually exist, or at least we tell ourselves that to rationalize our slowly ebbing focus and drive in school. But the truth hurts: We still have about three months left of high school, and no amount of complaining, grumbling or crying is going to change that fact or speed things up.

We are not helpless against this soul-crushing disease however, and there are ways we can fight against its many destructive symptoms. Throughout the past three years, we have conquered the awkwardness of freshman year, mastered dealing with elevated stress in our sophomore year, and, most impressively, survived the horrors of junior year with at least half of our sanity intact. After all we have accomplished and learned, our Senioritis shall be cured, if not by this article, then certainly by the diplomas we will receive in a few months. Until then, try out a few of the tips mentioned below to help ease the pain (it’s at least something to do with all the time you’re spending not doing your homework):

USE THE WORDS ‘ONLY’ AND ‘LAST’ MORE OFTEN

Sometimes the best way to feel more positive is to trick yourself into doing so. When you say there’s ONLY 91 days left of your LAST year in high school, it’s much more effective than groaning every time you check your countdown app. These words also help put the next few months into perspective: In all actuality, many of the things that have become routine for you will cease to exist after graduation, and the end of some those things will not be as easy to celebrate as taking your last AP exam. Eventually, you’ll be eating your last lunch outside on the court surrounded by friends. You’ll be sharing your last laugh with that kid who sits behind you in physics, and walking past the butterfly-shaped garden in the courtyard for the last time.  Make sure you’re enjoying all your lasts, and not passing them by in the stupor of your Senioritis-inspired irritation.

TRY NEW THINGS

Stepping out of your comfort zone is about to become a major theme in your life, so you might as well get a head start and push yourself to do something you’ve never dared to try before.  Ask that guy in your government class to prom, join the Frisbee team, learn how to do your own laundry! Don’t just spend these next few months moping and convincing yourself your life is really difficult because adults still expect you to wake up before noon. This is your chance to make a few more memories, and allow yourself to continue maturing (surely some of us could stand to improve in this area) before Real Life hits.  And really, you should stop checking your inbox fifteen times a day, and use that energy and fervor towards something productive.

THE FUTURE IS INEVITABLE

Just remember that no matter how antsy you get waiting to be through with high school, there WILL be a day when you’re actually done, and your future, whatever that may be, WILL be imminent;  your feelings of impatience will be but a distant memory. Sometimes the wait can feel slower than trying to get through the 600 hallway when the lunch bell rings, but here’s the thing about time: it stops for no one. In the same way, there will be a day when you’re wishing time would move a little slower, so learn to appreciate its pace while you’re young enough to keep up with it. The future IS coming, so don’t waste your time willing it to be the present.