Is Vegetarianism for You?

Is+Vegetarianism+for+You%3F

By Lydia Stonerook

After being a vegetarian for over ten years, one becomes used to constant questions, most of which start with “Why?”. As a kid, it was because I couldn’t stomach the idea of eating the adorable cows and pigs that I saw at the local petting zoo. Then, as I began to grow up and research what it truly means to be a vegetarian, my diet became much more important. After being a vegetarian for over ten years, one becomes used to constant questions, most of which start with “Why?”. As a kid, it was because I couldn’t stomach the idea of eating the adorable cows and pigs that I saw at the local petting zoo. Then, as I began to grow up and research what it truly means to be a vegetarian, my diet became much more important.

   According to research compiled by Down to Earth,  an average of 40% of the world’s grain production goes to feeding livestock while a person dies every four seconds from starvation. If all crops grown around the world went directly to the people instead of animals, an additional four billion people would be fed. In addition to feeding the hungry, vegetable based diets help provide clean water for those living without. According to research done by One Green Planet, raising one pound of beef requires almost 1.800 gallons of water.  Lastly, according to a 2006 report from the United Nations, raising livestock for food generates more greenhouse gases than the world’s cars and trucks combined.     Vegetarian and vegan diets aren’t for everyone. Some people have health problems that require added nutrients found more abundantly in meat. Others feel that a special diet would be too cumbersome when at restaurants or a friend’s house. However, it is important for everyone to be aware of the global impact of their actions. By simply eating meatless once a week, you save not only animals lives, but provide water and food for those struggling in poverty.