Top 5 Most Popular Christmas Gifts

By Sharon Shatananda

*From most common request to least common

*Out of 62 students surveyed

 

1. An iPhone

It seems there are going to be a lot of Apple products under trees this Christmas. When students were asked their top gift request this Christmas, a remarkable 54%  of wishes were for Apple products. For those who requested iPhones, the gifts were mostly specific to the iPhone 5s, though an iPod, a Mac, and accessories were also on many wish lists.

Apart from Apple, other requests in the electronics category were computers, laptops or keyboards, and game systems.

Most memorable gift request: A record player

2. A Car, Food, or Nothing at All

In the end,  20% of students’ top gift wishes fell into this “other” category, made up of cars, food, or nothing at all. For food, one above and beyond survey taker even provided examples of possible restaurants, like Subway or Kobe, while all wishes for cars came from underclassmen.There were also a few requests for a card game, books, or a guitar.

Most memorable gift request: Red Robin gift card

3. Clothes

Whether it was combat boots, Steve Maddens, rain boots, or Uggs, nearly every request for clothing was for shoes — boots, specifically. 58% of students in this category asked for shoes, with one particularly sensible student also including socks in their wish.

As for clothes themselves, not many specified what kind, but one student who did went with athletic clothing.

Most memorable gift request: Rain boots

4. Sports Equipment

Though the percentage of students who went for sports equipment was only 11%, the breakdown within the category was reasonably varied. Under this category, Nike Free Runs showed the potential to be under several Christmas trees. Frisbees also had quite a few requests, while the other three gift wishes were for either lacrosse equipment or sports jerseys.

Most memorable gift request: A hunting rifle

5. Money

Traditionally, money is what you ask for when you cannot think of a gift but still want the option to buy something later. But, very surprisingly, only 3% of students said that they wanted money for Christmas.